heavenlypophits:

The Clean: There Was Sound (Interview with LA Record)

The cultural importance of Flying Nun and the Dunedin scene seems to be growing exponentially in stature. We music freaks here in the U.S. have over-romanticized the Dunedin scene …
Yeah, it was really vibrant. Most of us were unemployed, it was post- the oil crisis and the beginning of corporate hell really in some ways. There was a lot of unemployment, so a lot of young people with a lot of free time, and unemployment benefits really funded a lot of music and art in New Zealand, especially in the 80s, the old dole. This was the period of the Chills, the Verlaines … We were always doing shows and rehearsing, everyone was always checking each other out and everyone was writing songs. There was so much good music around; it was a little explosion.
[x]


This is such a good interview. David Kilgour talks about the beginnings of The Clean, Bob Scott’s songwriting abilities and Hank Williams.

heavenlypophits:

The Clean: There Was Sound (Interview with LA Record)

The cultural importance of Flying Nun and the Dunedin scene seems to be growing exponentially in stature. We music freaks here in the U.S. have over-romanticized the Dunedin scene …

Yeah, it was really vibrant. Most of us were unemployed, it was post- the oil crisis and the beginning of corporate hell really in some ways. There was a lot of unemployment, so a lot of young people with a lot of free time, and unemployment benefits really funded a lot of music and art in New Zealand, especially in the 80s, the old dole. This was the period of the Chills, the Verlaines … We were always doing shows and rehearsing, everyone was always checking each other out and everyone was writing songs. There was so much good music around; it was a little explosion.

[x]

This is such a good interview. David Kilgour talks about the beginnings of The Clean, Bob Scott’s songwriting abilities and Hank Williams.

by heavenlypophits

August 17, 2012 at 13:06

// Tags: la record the clean the bats flying nun dunedin sound // 12 Notes
Double LP of B-sides!
This will probably be the last record I buy for a while. I’m moving into a dorm and will have nowhere to play my records. :[

Double LP of B-sides!

This will probably be the last record I buy for a while. I’m moving into a dorm and will have nowhere to play my records. :[

August 13, 2012 at 15:02

// Tags: the clean oddities flying nun // 11 Notes

lightbulbhead:

Great 16 minute documentary on the Dunedin scene circa 1982.

by lightbulbhead

July 14, 2012 at 16:24

// Tags: flying nun the clean toy love the chills the enemy // 11 Notes

by tetsuota-desu

May 24, 2012 at 22:31

// Tags: the clean Flying Nun // 13 Notes

Interview with Hamish Kilgour of The Clean

"I like minimalism in music […] often in the simplicity, you find magic things."

He talks about the bands entire trajectory through the scenes in Auckland and Dunedin.

May 20, 2012 at 16:32

// Tags: flying nun the clean 95bfm dunedin sound // 7 Notes
doomandgloomfromthetomb:

Quickstep
There are definitely days when The Clean sound like the greatest band ever. There’s a perfect, timeless feel in almost everything they’ve ever done — it’s not “folk” music in the way we think of it, but it’s natural music, earth music, heart music. You know what I’m saying? I don’t know what I’m saying. Except that David, Hamish and Robert make some pretty righteous sounds, dig? What I’ve got for you today is a 1981 tape of the band at the Rumba Club in Auckland, NZ, playing to a ridiculously tiny crowd. The recording quality could be better, but crank it up and you won’t mind, as The Clean blast through their classic Compilation-era material, as well as some tunes that (as far as I know) never made it to the studio. Of special interest is the epic “Point That Thing Somewhere Else,” which sees the trio stretching out and loosening up over 15 blissful minutes. So good! The Clean keeps on tally-ho-ing to this day, with a U.S. tour imminent. Go see them if you can — and God Bless The Clean!!! Oh, and thanks to Jonah for sharing the tape. 
Download
Bonus: There are a bunch of grrrrreat videos of The Clean playing this very same venue. 

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

Quickstep

There are definitely days when The Clean sound like the greatest band ever. There’s a perfect, timeless feel in almost everything they’ve ever done — it’s not “folk” music in the way we think of it, but it’s natural music, earth music, heart music. You know what I’m saying? I don’t know what I’m saying. Except that David, Hamish and Robert make some pretty righteous sounds, dig? What I’ve got for you today is a 1981 tape of the band at the Rumba Club in Auckland, NZ, playing to a ridiculously tiny crowd. The recording quality could be better, but crank it up and you won’t mind, as The Clean blast through their classic Compilation-era material, as well as some tunes that (as far as I know) never made it to the studio. Of special interest is the epic “Point That Thing Somewhere Else,” which sees the trio stretching out and loosening up over 15 blissful minutes. So good! The Clean keeps on tally-ho-ing to this day, with a U.S. tour imminent. Go see them if you can — and God Bless The Clean!!! Oh, and thanks to Jonah for sharing the tape. 

Download

Bonus: There are a bunch of grrrrreat videos of The Clean playing this very same venue. 

by doomandgloomfromthetomb

April 04, 2012 at 18:45

// Tags: the clean // 45 Notes
the212kid:

Great NZ band.

the212kid:

Great NZ band.

by elsewhere.co.nz

March 06, 2012 at 20:45

// Tags: the clean // 53 Notes

The Clean - “On Again/Off Again”

March 04, 2012 at 23:49

// Tags: flying nun the clean // 6 Notes
I came across this flow chart about the influence Flying Nun bands have had on influential American and English bands.

One of the most romantic myths about Flying Nun is that its bands were far more acclaimed internationally than in New Zealand […] It is largely unfounded though. Flying Nun bands were mostly even less popular in the United States than they were in New Zealand. There’s a reason why Neil Finn owns a quarter of Flying Nun, while many of its bands can’t afford to buy their own records.

I’m just going to turn this into a Flying Nun appreciation blog from now on. Everyone needs to know.

I came across this flow chart about the influence Flying Nun bands have had on influential American and English bands.

One of the most romantic myths about Flying Nun is that its bands were far more acclaimed internationally than in New Zealand […] It is largely unfounded though. Flying Nun bands were mostly even less popular in the United States than they were in New Zealand. There’s a reason why Neil Finn owns a quarter of Flying Nun, while many of its bands can’t afford to buy their own records.

I’m just going to turn this into a Flying Nun appreciation blog from now on. Everyone needs to know.

by theaxemen.org

by presscolor

November 03, 2011 at 12:27

// Tags: the clean // 10 Notes
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